Category Archives: Economic Empowerment

Camden Civil Rights Project Endorses Bernie Sanders in 2016

Bernie Sanders has a consistent thirty year track record of advocating for social justice and economic empowerment of the middle and working classes…..

 

 

Camden Civil Rights Project supports Sanders’ racial justice, women’s rights, LGBT equality, single payer healthcare, tuition free higher education, minimum living wage and corporate reform proposals

BERNIE SANDERS

On the Issues

The American people must make a fundamental decision. Do we continue the 40-year decline of our middle class and the growing gap between the very rich and everyone else, or do we fight for a progressive economic agenda that creates jobs, raises wages, protects the environment and provides health care for all? Are we prepared to take on the enormous economic and political power of the billionaire class, or do we continue to slide into economic and political oligarchy? These are the most important questions of our time, and how we answer them will determine the future of our country.

INCOME AND WEALTH INEQUALITY

IT’S TIME TO MAKE COLLEGE TUITION FREE AND DEBT FREE

GETTING BIG MONEY OUT OF POLITICS AND RESTORING DEMOCRACY

CREATING DECENT PAYING JOBS

A LIVING WAGE

COMBATING CLIMATE CHANGE TO SAVE THE PLANET

A FAIR AND HUMANE IMMIGRATION POLICY

RACIAL JUSTICE

FIGHTING FOR WOMEN’S RIGHTS

FIGHTING FOR LGBT EQUALITY

CARING FOR OUR VETERANS

MEDICARE FOR ALL

FIGHTING FOR DISABILITY RIGHTS

STRENGTHEN AND EXPAND SOCIAL SECURITY

FIGHTING TO LOWER PRESCRIPTION DRUG PRICES

IMPROVING THE RURAL ECONOMY

REFORMING WALL STREET

REAL FAMILY VALUES

WAR AND PEACE

WAR SHOULD BE THE LAST OPTION: WHY I SUPPORT THE IRAN DEAL

REAL TAX REFORM POLICIES THAT SEN. SANDERS HAS PROPOSED

HOW BERNIE PAYS FOR HIS PROPOSALS

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HOW BERNIE STACKS UP AGAINST THE OTHER CANDIDATES

How Class Works

This video was produced by the National Association of County and City Public Health Officals (NACCHO) as a part of thier Roots of Heath Inequality Project. The project is a web-based course for the public health workforce and “How Class Works” is one section of the course.

The social and economic origins of health inequity have been well-documented since the industrial revolution in the 1840s. Recent data demonstrates a staggering and growing degree of social and economic inequality in the U.S. not seen since the Great Depression. Rates of disease and illness for people with low income are worsening across almost all categories and geographic areas in the U.S.

In this short video, economist Richard Wolff explains our class society and applies that understanding to our current financial recession. Wolff argues that a minority class determines the way our society distributes the output and places those who receive the profits in the position of deciding how they are utilized, “…We all live with the results of what a really tiny minority in our society decides to do with the profits everybody produces.” As you watch and listen, consider what we have learned about disease and illness patterns among groups with lower income, more stress, and less control of their lives. Consider how investment decisions in neighborhoods over transportation, school facilities, parks, location of grocery stores, quality of affordable housing, etc. influenced by powerful interests, affect the quality of life for large segments of our population.

The Great Sit Down

The 1976 BBC documentary, The Great Sit Down, focuses on the United Auto Workers’ struggle for recognition and the sit-down strikes against General Motors which took place in February 1937.

At 8 p.m. on December 30, 1936, in one of the first sit-down strikes in the United States, autoworkers occupy the General Motors Fisher Body Plant Number One in Flint, Michigan. The autoworkers were striking to win recognition of the United Auto Workers (UAW) as the only bargaining agent for GM’s workers; they also wanted to make the company stop sending work to non-union plants and to establish a fair minimum wage scale, a grievance system and a set of procedures that would help protect assembly-line workers from injury. In all, the strike lasted 44 days.

The Flint sit-down strike was not spontaneous; UAW leaders, inspired by similar strikes across Europe, had been planning it for months. The strike actually began at smaller plants: Fisher Body in Atlanta on November 16, GM in Kansas City on December 16 and a Fisher stamping plant in Cleveland on December 28. The Flint plant was the biggest coup, however: it contained one of just two sets of body dies that GM used to stamp out almost every one of its 1937 cars. By seizing control of the Flint plant, autoworkers could shut down the company almost entirely.

So, on the evening of December 30, the Flint Plant’s night shift simply stopped working. They locked themselves in and sat down. “She’s ours!” one worker shouted.

GM argued that the strikers were trespassing and got a court order demanding their evacuation; still, the union men stayed put. GM turned off the heat in the buildings, but the strikers wrapped themselves in coats and blankets and hunkered down. On January 11, police tried to cut off the strikers’ food supply; in the resulting riot, known as the “Battle of the Running Bulls,” 16 workers and 11 policemen were injured and the UAW took over the adjacent Fisher Two plant. On February 1, the UAW won control of the enormous Chevrolet No. 4 engine factory. GM’s output went from a robust 50,000 cars in December to just 125 in February.

Despite GM’s enormous political clout, Michigan Governor Frank Murphy refused to use force to break the strike. Though the sit-ins were illegal, he believed, he also believed that authorizing the National Guard to break the strike would be an enormous mistake. “If I send those soldiers right in on the men,” he said, “there’d be no telling how many would be killed.” As a result, he declared, “The state authorities will not take sides. They are here only to protect the public peace.”

Meanwhile, President Roosevelt urged GM to recognize the union so that the plants could reopen. In mid-February, the automaker signed an agreement with the UAW. Among other things, the workers were given a 5 percent raise and permission to speak in the lunchroom.

Copyright Disclaimer:

Under Section 107 of the Copyright Act 1976, allowance is made for “fair use” for  criticism, comment, news reporting, teaching, scholarship, and research.  Non-profit, educational or personal use tips the balance in favor of fair use.

The Fight in the Fields: César Chávez and the Farmworker’s Movement

“The Fight in the Fields” traces the history of the United Farmworkers Union and the life of its founder, César Chávez, from his birth in Arizona, his education into organizing and non-violence, his formation of the union, to his death in 1993. It includes newsreel footage of the Delano grape boycott, Senate hearings conducted by Robert F. Kennedy, Chávez’s fasts, encounters with growers and rival Teamsters. Recent interviews with Chávez family members, Ethyl Kennedy, Roger Cardinal Mahony, Governor Jerry Brown, and current and past UFW leaders round out the history and assessment of Chávez and the Union.

Outliers: The Story of Success

In Outliers: The Story of Success, best selling author and journalist, Malcolm Gladwell, examines the environmental factors which have provided the opportunity for successful “outliers” to emerge in our society — those highly motivated achievers who outperform the bell curve of traditional expectations.

In this innovative and entertaining case study, Gladwell examines how the combination of personal determination and advantageous social  conditions have allowed highly successful individuals, such as the Beatles, Bill Gates, and the founders of the corporate law firm Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom LLP, to cultivate the neceassary talents to take advantage of incredible opportunities when they presented themselves.

In addition, the author explores how cultural legacy affects an individual’s chances of success. Gladwell discusses how the NTSB investigations of conversations prior to plane crashes uncovered the cultural relationship between how individuals are socialized to interact with authority figures, and the ability of flight crews to communicate effectively during a crisis. In examining a series of flight recorders, experts found that cultures which are socialized to display higher deference towards authority figures were less likely to challenge perceived superiors and more likely to make mitigating statements during a crisis, leading them to inadequately express the necessary urgency to induce an emergency response. This discovery has resulted in better safety training throughout the airline industry. Gladwell also introduces a linguistic difference between how Asian and Western cultures communicate numbers and mathematical formulas which he believes may help explain why students in Asian countries consistently rank higher than their Western counterparts in Math and Science scores.

Outliers challenges the prevailing notion that success is simply the result of individual exceptionalism by examining the different social opportunities and cultural legacies between highly talented individuals who have enjoyed success, versus those who have gone unnoticed. The book explores the extent to which an individual’s community mores, social capital, and position in the social hierarchy affects their social opportunities and future chance of success. Gladwell suggests that recognizing and adjusting for cultural strengths and weaknesses creates a greater opportunity for individuals to achieve their maximum potential.

 

Malcolm Gladwell is a bestselling author, journalist and social theorist who is best known for his innovative  theories on complex social relationships.

He has been a staff writer for The New Yorker since 1996, and has written five New York Times bestsellers, which include: The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference (2000), Blink: The Power of Thinking Without Thinking (2005), Outliers: The Story of Success (2008), a collection of his journalism,entitled, What the Dog Saw: And Other Adventures (2009),  and David and Goliath: Underdogs, Misfits, and the Art of Battling Giants (2013).

 

John Rawls: The Veil of Ignorance (2015)

Synopsis: What’s your blueprint for a just society? Your answer probably reflects who you are and the situation you find yourself in. If you’re rich, you may well be in favour of the freedom to earn and enjoy the fruits of your efforts; if you’re poor you’re likely to be more supportive of a system that redistributes wealth. John Rawls argued it might be more just to construct this blueprint from behind a ‘veil of ignorance’.

From the BBC Radio 4 series about life’s big questions – A History of Ideas. http://www.bbc.co.uk/historyofideas

This project is from the BBC in partnership with The Open University, the animations were created by Cognitive.