Category Archives: Civil Rights

Discrimination Against “Discrete and Insular Minorities”

This episode of Crash Course in Government and Politics provides a general overview of the Fourteenth Amendment’s protection of “discrete and insular minorities.” Discussed is the historical instances of discrimination against Asian, European, and Latino immigrants, Native Americans, non-English speakers, people with disabilities, and LGBT people. Also discussed are federal and state responses to this discrimination and some brief historical context for the legal protection of vulnerable groups.

Employment Discrimination

This episode of Crash Course in Government and Politics provides a general overview of discrimination in the workplace. The video focuses on gender discrimination and sexual harassment claims, which are handled somewhat differently by the courts than racial or religious discrimination. In gender discrimination claims the court applies an intermediate level of scrutiny which is summarized in the video. Also discussed are disparate impact claims and how these cases are handled by the courts. Employment protections are guaranteed by federal statute, rather than the Constitution, therefore, apply in both, the private and public sectors.

Produced in collaboration with PBS Digital Studios: http://youtube.com/pbsdigitalstudios

Equal Protection Under the Law

This episode of Crash Course in Government and Politics provides a general overview of the Fourteenth Amendment’s equal protection clause. Discussed is the concept that the law should be applied equally to everyone and what this means in terms of our civil rights. As opposed to civil liberties, or our protections from the government, civil rights differ in that they involve how some groups or individuals are permitted to treat other groups or individuals (usually minorities) under existing laws. The video explains the process the Supreme Court follows in racial, ethnic and religious discrimination cases, known as “strict scrutiny,” and examines one landmark case, Brown v Board of Education, and its role in kick-starting the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s.